Molding looks important when painted black

Earley photo 2-12If you are a true interior decorating aficionado, I am sure you have experienced this. It happens when you least expect it. You know the feeling … you walk into a room and let out a gasp. The room is incredible, and you have to stop and simply absorb it.

This typically happens when risks are taken with skill. One of my favorite leaps out of the norm is an unexpected color of molding.

I once saw a room painted an unassuming pale blue and the thick molding around the windows, the crown molding, and the doors were all painted a warm black. Yes, black molding paired with unassuming pale blue walls sounds horrible. The finished product was incredible.

Black is that grounding color that flatters any hue that stands alongside it. Black is thought of as a sophisticated color, but for those who fear the dark, it’s often written off as too risky.

Sophistication is defined by black, so light walls and black trim and doors are destined to be classic. Crown molding, doors, shoe molding, stair treads, railings, bookcases and cabinetry take on an air of importance when painted black.

When black is too intimidating, consider a color for molding and doors while leaving the walls a color closer to white. Elevated style can be added to this combination by adding nail heads to the closet door.

These techniques are most effective when the remainder of the room is somewhat quiet and just a few focal points demand attention. The drama of the molding makes it a major focal point, and it must be regarded as such, or the room risks becoming kitschy.

Technique is important for a professional finish. Spray painting your molding and doors is ideal, but if that is not an option, use a dense foam roller. Brush marks will be obvious with gloss trim paint.

Vicky Earley

Vicky is the principal designer for Artichoke Designs in the Art & Design District in Carmel.

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