Opinion: Where only true leaders are needed

We’re sure you’ve heard the fallout about President Barack Obama’s no-show at the Paris anti-terrorism march, which drew “dozens of world leaders” on Jan. 11. Quite frankly, we don’t understand what all the fuss is about. Everything we’ve read and heard about the incident emphasized how the event drew “world leaders,” several of which represent some of America’s closest allies, including Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, French President Francois Hollande, British Prime Minister David Cameron, Spanish Minister Mariana Rajoy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, among others. In Obama’s defense, the key words are, as we see it,  “world leaders,” and, as such, Obama simply doesn’t qualify. Therefore, we don’t see reason for the uproar regarding his absence. As the White House fumbled for a response to enquiring reporters, it cited security concerns as one reason behind his absence; however, it was comforting to know security standards were met when, on the day following the march, Jan. 12, the “leader of the free world” accepted a San Antonio Spurs jersey, when he honored the team’s 2014 NBA championship. Brave soul, he.

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College football crowned its first playoff champion last Monday, when Ohio State defeated Oregon in the inaugural game. On the non-football side of the equation, it was refreshing to see a Super Bowl-type atmosphere functioning not with corporate types in the stands and at the various related venues, but with true fans of the teams or college football in general. Bands, cheerleaders, stadium-wide chants … it all made for a fine experience, when the opposite could have happened.

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An American Beauty: This one takes the rose. As one of us unwrapped his dry cleaning the other day and took out a shirt, the hanger was covered by paper on which was imprinted “Caution: Do Not Swallow.” That’s rich! It’s either proof that humanity is headed for the day it becomes extinct or that a liberal somewhere tried eat a hanger, became injured and ended up suing the dry cleaner and the hangar manufacturer.